Raeanne C. Moore and colleagues published a paper on "Daily Activities Related to Mobile Cognitive Performance in Middle-Aged and Older Adults: An Ecological Momentary Cognitive Assessment Study".

Working, reading and other cognitively stimulating activities are related to better cognitive functioning. Conversely, studies have found that passive activities such as watching television are related to worse cognitive functioning. One problem with the current research on understanding the relationships between daily activities and cognitive functioning is that cognitive testing is usually done on a single day in a lab, which may not reflect real world cognitive performance. In this study, we used smartphones to test participants’ cognitive functions multiple times a day immediately after different types of activity (i.e., at different times during the day, participants’ smartphones would survey what they were doing and then ask them to complete a short cognition test.). The cognitive abilities we tested were executive functioning and learning.

Several HNRP investigators contributed to the International Neuropsychological Society (INS) Annual Meeting in San Diego (virtual event) on February 2-5, 2021. This year's theme was: From Autism to Alzheimer's: New Perspectives in Neuropsychology. HNRP researchers presented on topics such as cognition, HIV, substance use, medical measures and behavior.

Posters/Presentations:

Breton J, Kamalyan L, Paredes AM, Guarena LA, Watson WM, Cherner M, Moore RC, Marquine MJ. Psychological acculturation and cognition among older Latinos living with and without HIV. (poster)

Campbell LM, Parrish E, Heaton A, Swendsen J, Depp CA, Moore RC. The Relationship Between Contextual Factors, Performance, and Validity of Smartphone-Based Mobile Cognitive Tests of Executive Function and Learning. (poster)

Several HNRP investigators contributed to the International Neuropsychological Society (INS) Annual Meeting in Denver on February 5-8, 2020. This year's theme was: Neuropsychology in the Era of Precision Medicine. HNRP researchers presented on topics such as cognition, HIV, substance use, medical measures and behavior.

Posters/Presentations:

Hussain M, Morgan EE, Iudicello JE, Heaton RK, Grant I, and the TMARC Group.  Methamphetamine dependence and low self-efficacy have an additive effect on impulsivity and disinhibition.

Kohli, M. Slower gait speed is differntially associated with worse neurocognition among persons with and without HIV.

Three days reflecting on the Department's Scientific, Educational, and Clinical Achievements (April 4, 5, and 6, 2019).

 

Click on the image to be redirected to the agenda and presentations when available.

Sara Gianella-Weibel, MD, is an Assistant Adjunct Professor at the UCSD School of Medicine and an HNRP investigator. The integrity award recognizes individuals, departments, organizational units and students who have made outstanding contributions in support of UC San Diego's commitment to integrity. “Integrity” equals adherence to moral and ethical principles.

When the Dalai Lama came to UCSD in 2012 to speak he highlighted that secular education and science must be melded with a critical dialogue in ethics.  UCSD invited the Dalai Lama back in 2017 for the commencement speech to share messages of global compassion, with an emphasis on education, scientific inquiry and global responsibility. “These are the ideals we aim to instill in our UC San Diego faculty, staff and students,” said Chancellor Pradeep K. Khosla. To be recognized for these qualities by one’s peers, in addition to being a top-notch scientist, is indeed an achievement to be proud of. Congratulations Sara!

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